Entering Week 12

It’s the start of week 12 already!!! In a little under 5 weeks I will be graduating!! (And just in case you’re wondering, only 29 days until my last final and only 32 days until pinning!!!)

I’ve had some changes with my CCI schedule…in the middle of October I got an email stating that I was no longer allowed in the ED at the VA due to them taking precautions with potential Ebola situations, so I was given a new preceptor and a new floor – a med-surg floor. Honestly I wasn’t thrilled, for several reasons. I had grown to love being in the ED and I knew what was expected of me, I LOVED my preceptor and we got along really well, and I was scheduled to be done with my shifts on Halloween. Due to the timing of when I was able to get ahold of my new preceptor and begin shifts with her, plus the fact that she works 8hr shifts instead of 12hr shifts, meant that my CCI shifts were stretched out a bit further into November. Instead of only having 4 (12hr) shifts left to complete, I now had 6 (8hr) shifts to complete.

I also thought that I wouldn’t enjoy this new change due to the fact that I’d be on a med-surg floor, but honestly I’ve really had a good time with my new preceptor and on this floor with these patients!! I’ve done a TON more charting and medication administration, as well as looking at lab trends and looking into the H&P of these patients, which I really didn’t do in the ED because our patients were with us for such a short amount of time. At this point I’ve taken up to 3 patients, I’ve given report on 3 patients at the end of the shift (not very successfully, but thankfully the nurse I was giving report to was kind and gave me tips for how to do it better next time), and I should be taking 4 patients on my next and last shift which is this upcoming Wednesday. I can’t believe my VERY LAST CLINICAL IN NURSING SCHOOL is this Wednesday!!!

Tomorrow after our leadership and management test, our entire class is going to be taking a class picture for our pinning ceremony, so we get to wear our scrubs but actually look pretty in them for once, being that we can wear our hair down and wear makeup. Everything is wrapping up so quickly now that I feel like I can’t keep track of it all! I can’t believe that we are so close to being done.

A couple of days ago I bought my graduation announcements, all my honor cords that I will be wearing at graduation, bought my diploma frame (it’s gorgeous!) and registered with Pearson Vue to take the NCLEX. AHHHH.

I took my exit HESI about two weeks ago but I made a 904 on it (which converted to an 83%) so I’m going to re-take it. I don’t feel like I NEED to retake it since I made over an 850, however I figured it’d be good practice, plus I BARELY have a chance at making an A in CCI with that score so if I can get a better score the second time around, then my chances of making an A are much higher (they take the higher of the two scores – they don’t average them out, thankfully!).

So here’s what’s left in this semester and then I’m DONE!

  • 2 tests (L&M tomorrow, Communities next Monday)
  • 2 quizzes (Communities quizzes before each exam)
  • 2 projects (One in Communities, one in CCI)
  • 1 clinical (last one on WEDNESDAY!)
  • 1 clinical log (for Communities)
  • 1 HESI
  • 2 finals

I can’t believe it! I’m so close it’s insane!!

Summer Updates

Well I can’t believe my summer is almost over!! As of yesterday, only 5 more weeks until my “last first day of school” – at least for my undergrad! 😉

My summer has simultaneously been busy (aka it’s gone by super fast) and very relaxing. I went to the Dominican Republic for a 10 day medical mission trip almost right at the beginning of my summer – which I’ll post about later this week – and then to Alabama for a week-long family vacation only 3 weeks after getting back from the DR. In the meantime I’ve been working working working (I’ve gone part-time over the summer!) and hanging out with friends as often as I can before school starts up again. I’ve also read an insane amount of books that aren’t school-related. 🙂

I must say I am SO thankful that my last summer while in school came after my S1 semester! I really, truly needed this break after that craziness. I can’t imagine if I’d only gotten winter break after S1 before diving right in to S2. Even though I thought I would’ve rather started nursing school a semester earlier than I did and graduated this past May…I have to say that all things work out just the way they’re supposed to.

So, ready for a couple of exciting updates?

First, June 26th I APPLIED FOR GRADUATION!!!

It’s just so hard to wrap my mind around the fact that after being in school for 5 years – I’m almost DONE! I have actually reached the point where I can apply for graduation…and I can plan for my graduation party in December. INSANE!

Second, I asked my manager at work if she could give me any advice/tips on how to apply for the residency program that my hospital has for graduate nurses and if there was any way that I would end up on the floor that I’m already working on (a progressive cardiac care unit – basically a telemetry step-down from ICU). She told me that I just need to let her know when the residency program started releasing jobs to apply for and she would create a position for me on the floor. WHAT?!?! My jaw literally dropped right there in her office and I was speechless for a moment. She would really do that?! She said that she doesn’t hire nursing students as PCTs without the possibility that they stay on the floor as graduate nurses – as long as she feels like they do a good job, will be a great nurse, and fit in well.

Of course there’s still a possibility that I won’t get it…I think that even if she created the position with me in mind she still has to interview about 10-15 people for the job and she might think that someone will work out better. And I’m still going to be applying for ICU and ER positions at other hospitals as well. But it makes my heart glow to know that she values me to the point that she would create a residency position for me when I graduate.

Speaking of applying to other positions, that brings me to my third update: I finished my resume a couple of weeks ago and I think it looks FANTASTIC. Now I haven’t had anyone professional look at it yet (I’ll do that when school starts back up and there’s a workshop on campus), but I really love the look of it and the fact that I said EVERYTHING I wanted to say on two pages without it looking cluttered and “busy.” Now I just need to write cover letters for each of the hospitals I’ll be applying to (another thing to finish before school begins again) and I’ll be ready to apply as soon as positions start opening up!

Well I think that’s about it for now…things are going to start heating up within the next few weeks as I start to get ready for this last semester!! For now, I’m going to go get a workout in and then hang out with my brother for the day. 🙂 Audios!

3 More Tests!!

A week from today, I will be DONE DONE DONE with this crazy, hellish semester! I’m so excited right now…I don’t think I’ve been in this great of a mood since the first day back. I’M ALMOST DONE!!

Of course I have to study for finals…I’m three days away from the first one (Mental Health on Saturday) and I haven’t studied yet. But alas, such is my normal habit. Honestly I really will try my best with the three remaining days I have but I’m not expecting much. At this point (sadly) I will be happy with accepting my Bs and moving on.

Just so ready for it to be over.

 

HESI For the Win

I really should not be advocating not studying as much as I have in my blog. But I am trying to paint an honest picture of my journey through nursing school, and as it stands right now I am SUCH a slacker when it comes to studying. Typically I cram two days before the test and hope for the best. Definitely not the best method but somehow it’s working – and since this semester I really don’t have much time to study during the week it’s really my only option.

Took my HESI a couple of days ago (Tuesday). Too bad it is only worth 5% of my Adult 2 grade because I KILLED IT. And I did NO studying for it whatsoever. In fact, I read an entire novel this past weekend before the test. Oops. But, something can be said about how thoroughly TWU teaches us because I felt like I really knew all the information the HESI presented to me, even without studying and “brushing up.”

I ended up making an 1146, which is higher than both my J1 (1116) and my J2 (925) HESI. Converted, I made a 99.99% and was in the 93rd percentile.

I told my best friend that I wish we were in S2 and that had been my grade for HESI – because in S2 the HESI is worth 30% of your grade!

Speaking of S2, we received our “preference sheet” on Tuesday before our HESI. It had a ton of options on it for instructor led clinicals, preceptor led clinicals, and then of course our community health clinicals. For our Critical Competency Integration class (CCI) I chose preceptor-led clinicals and my #1 spot was the VA, followed by Parkland and Methodist Dallas. We shall see what happens, but I’m pretty sure I’ll get the VA this time. I already turned my preference sheet in; because the VA has to start a background check so early on those who will be “working” there then I should hear back pretty soon.

So what classes do I have next semester? I have CCI, community health, and leadership and management. CCI is the “big” one. This is where we have either instructor-led or preceptor-led (if you’re lucky) clinicals, and have to complete 120 hrs of clinical. We will be reviewing everything we have learned the past 3 semesters in the CCI lectures in order to prepare us for the exit HESI and then NCLEX. This class is worth 6 credit hours but I hear it’s tons of fun.

Community health is just what it sounds like – community health. We will be doing a couple rounds of school nursing, homeless shelters, possibly home health and hospice nursing, etc. I’ve heard that the projects in community health are a beat-down but I’m actually quite excited about this class. Especially because at one time in my college career I was contemplating getting my Masters in Public Health (MPH). We’ll see if this class revives that desire or not. (More school?? Don’t know if I can right away).

Leadership and Management is an online class mostly, with a couple of class days and I believe tests are on campus as well. I’ve heard this class is difficult but doable.

I’ve heard from several S2 classmates that this next semester is SO much better than S1. As a general rule you have a LOT more time on your hands and the content isn’t as overwhelming. I’m so ready for that! Especially because I know we’ll all be trying to apply for jobs and handles any interviews that come our way (hopefully – crossing fingers!). I also know that dealing with senioritis is going to be a huge hurdle – because I’m already feeling it! It’s really going to be hard to come back from an awesome summer off and then go into our last semester. But I’m sure it’s also much easier knowing that it’s the last semester and graduation is literally right around the corner. The thought is mind-blowing!

Well I guess I’ve rambled on quite enough now. I have a test this upcoming Monday that I’m supposed to be studying for and obviously I’m procrastinating by writing a blog post. 😉 This test – child health – is the last one before finals! Tomorrow I have my last child health clinical (last clinical for this semester, period), and next Friday I have my last simulation for this semester. Then finals. AHHH it’s all wrapping up so nicely with a neat little bow. Can’t wait!!

April Showers

April showers bring May flowers? Is that how that saying goes? Regardless of the saying, I think it can be well understood that all I have to do is get through April and May will bring beauty and rest to my soul.

I’ve actually been doing quite well since spring break. Surprisingly, I’ve had more motivation to just sit down and “do it” and I’ve been able to stay on top of my assignments and studying without feeling the immense pressure that I did before spring break. And I say that it’s “surprising” because usually after spring break I’m all done in!

Last week marked the end of my mental health clinical (yay!!) and yesterday (Thursday) marked the end of my adult health 2 clinical!! I only have one more child health clinical – next Friday – and then I’ll be done aside from a simulation later in the month on campus. That simulation will be awesome, I think, because it’s the same one I did as a J1 with the S1’s, except now I’m the S1 and I’m sure I’ll be criticized by the J1’s…all in good fun. It’ll be neat to see the other side of the same coin. At least I know what I didn’t like about the S1’s that I was with that semester and hopefully won’t do the same things as an S1 myself.

This semester I’ve had some really great patients, some super sick patients, and have discovered that although I could’ve sworn I would never want to work in peds that it’s definitely a fun place to be. (I still want to do adult ICU – but I’m not opposed to applying for peds ICU). I’ve also learned that med-surg nurses are not “less competent” or any less/worse of a nurse just because they work in med-surg. They are SUPER busy and definitely just as smart and they really do make a difference for their patients.

Since spring break, I’ve taken three tests – child health was bright and early the Monday morning we got back to school – and I’ve done pretty well in each. In child health I made an 88%, which is great considered how very little I studied (it was spring break!!). In mental health I made a 93.75% (the highest grade this semester!), and in adult health, which I just took this past week, I made an 88%. Those grades have me sitting so far with an A in mental health, a B in child health, and a B in adult health. YAY! I’m just hoping I can keep it up, especially in adult health, because I don’t want any Cs!

What’s left for me in these last 4 weeks (how’d I get to this point?!):

  • We find out next Tuesday what next semester will be like, and will get to apply for preceptorship. YAY.
  • My adult health 2 HESI is next Tuesday as well. Hopefully I can study some this weekend before taking it!
  • Next Friday is my last child health clinical, and because it’s on Good Friday we will be getting out at 1230 instead of 1530. Score!
  • Child health exam 3
  • Poster project presentation (will give me 2 points toward my overall final adult health 2 grade!)
  • Adult health simulation with the J1’s
  • New student orientation for incoming J1 nursing students
  • FINALS! My first final is on a Saturday, boo…and then I finish them off on Monday and Tuesday, May 5th & 6th – and then I will be DONE!

You know you’re close when you can put everything you have left to do in a bullet point list! YEE-HAW. I’m ready.

 

An S1 Update

North Texas weather has been so fickle! Yesterday it was in the 80s. Today, in the 20s with freezing rain. As a result, delayed opening for school tomorrow – until noon. As a result of that: no child health class (because it’s from 0800-1100) which means I get a whole day off to study for my 2nd adult health exam on Tuesday morning! YAY!

So I haven’t updated in awhile…but these past few weeks have been SO insane! I’m constantly going somewhere and doing something, which doesn’t give me much time to get any studying done. So any extra time I have I’m either studying or taking a break. Most likely taking a break. 😉

But in the midst of this crazy semester, I have learned one thing for sure. I have learned where my nursing passion lies. I have had that “AHA!” moment where I felt a pull towards the area that I want to do nursing in. Any guesses???

If you guessed the ICU, you were correct!! I have come to find out that I am SO passionate about this field of nursing that I just cannot wait for my next clinical day in the ICU. I excitedly look forward to being there and learning new things, taking care of the sickest of the sick. I am loving learning about the critical care content in lecture that we’re being tested over on Tuesday…ABGs, ventilators, shock, hemodynamic monitoring, etc. I feel like I just can’t get enough. I feel like I have been re-awakened and no longer am I just trying to “survive.” Now I feel like I have something I’m striving towards again.

I just have to make it through the next 10 weeks and I’ll be done with this, the hardest of semesters. And then next semester, I get to start applying for my dream job – the ICU!

First Impressions, Part 1

My husband told me this morning: “I think you had a breakdown once per semester for J1 and J2. And in just one week of being an S1, you’ve had three.”

I think that sums up what this semester is going to be like for me. Although after surviving week one I’d have to say that I am truly VERY excited about what I’m going to get to learn and do this semester; I just hope I can make it to the end of these 16 weeks and PASS.

The week began rough. We had a child health lecture first and it covered how to communicate with children and then a lecture on the basic assessment of children. I say it began rough because first of all…I’m pretty sure that I don’t want to be a pediatric nurse, so the information in child health just doesn’t GRIP me the way that adult health does.

Second, I felt very “lost” in the lecture on how to communicate with children – almost as though the lecture had begun three weeks ago and I was just now getting into it. We discussed Erickson and Piaget, which I do remember from taking developmental psychology in pre-reqs, but hadn’t refreshed since then. Well this lecture literally had us “hit the ground running.” We were expected to know the different stages of development through Erickson and Piaget and we were expected to interact with that lecture by answering questions according to those developmental theories. Surprisingly I did remember quite a bit from my class two years ago…but I still felt like I’d just stumbled into this class after it’d been in progress for awhile. Not a comforting feeling when it’s your very first lecture of your senior year.

Third, the child assessment lecture really scared me. Children are NOT like adults. You don’t communicate with them the same way, and you don’t care for them the same way. And, although assessment is pretty universal, the way you assess a child feels different than the way you would assess an adult. Our instructor really stressed the importance of a VERY thorough assessment for children – not a focused assessment – because they could be fine one minute and in complete pulmonary arrest the next. That lecture scared me because as out instructor was teaching us how to assess a child, all I kept thinking was that I was going to forget something important and the child would end up in danger because I didn’t check their pulses or something like that! (I don’t think I’ll forget to check pulses, but you get what I’m saying.)

So that was Monday…and on Tuesday we had our first adult 2 lecture and mental health lecture. Adult began with a subject I love: the heart. However, we were given so much information in that lecture that I felt like we’d been given two weeks of information in only 3 hours. I’m wondering how I’m going to study for all that information and remember it all! And this information was just so different from previous material in Adult 1; it was more INTENSE and dealt with high-acuity diseases of the heart rather than the normal CHF, such as endocarditis, cardiomyopathy, pericarditis, cardiac tamponade, heart transplants, valve stenosis & regurgitation, valve replacements, and aortic aneurysms & dissections (yes, ALL of that in only 3 hours!).

I wasn’t sure what to expect in our mental health lecture but I’d like to say that I was pleasantly surprised. I’ve been dreading mental health since the first day of J1, however after just the one lecture on Tuesday and the follow-up lecture on Friday, I’m already convinced of how IMPORTANT it is for nursing students to take a mental health course and for nurses to understand mental health in EVERY aspect of nursing practice. And here’s why: no matter what kind of nurse you are, you will always need the skills of being able to communicate therapeutically with your patients and their family members.

Our lecture on Tuesday was a basic introductory lecture: why mental health is important, the different theories of psychology and why we study them, and an introduction to managed mental health care. On Friday (our mental health orientation, as it was called), we watched a video on mental health nurses – what they do and why it’s so important to them. That video made me cry for sure. Then we discussed the “therapeutic nurse-patient relationship”, the differences between sympathy and empathy, and how to recognize anxiety in ourselves and what to do about it.

So my first impressions from the lecture portions of this week: I think child health will be important but not really interesting for me (we’ll see how that changes once we start clinical). Adult health will be AWESOME but possibly quite overwhelming. And mental health will be something that I’ll look forward to every week (how unexpected!).

And why the breakdowns this week? I’m still not even quite sure. I think I’m just super stressed right now and every little thing makes me want to cry. There is a point at which, as a nursing student, you may be trying to do to much, and I think I might be there. But then again maybe I’m just trying to adjust to the different intensity of this semester and I’ll be fine once I get my feet on solid ground and can run with the rest of them.

We’ll see…

 

Thanksgiving Break

Well I’m on Thanksgiving break until December 4th (whoop!) however it’s not going to be much of a break. I’m trying to work on my major research project – a research article critique that is worth 50% of my grade – and it’s kicking my butt. There are 50 points that we have to touch on in this critique and so far I’ve only touched on 3. I think I may working on this awhile.

Also, the Wednesday we get back from break we have our 3rd Women’s exam (ew) and the next morning (Thursday) we have our J2 HESI. And then study study study because the week after that is finals!

At least my aging group project is done! And aside from all those tests I just have one more research quiz to complete, and one more aging discussion board to do (those two will be easy-peasy).

Can’t believe I’m almost a 50% RN! 😉

Happy Thanksgiving Break, everyone!! Enjoy the day and give a prayer of thanks for your friends and family who are supporting you through your adventures in life (I know I am!).

It's hard to concentrate when all I want to do is snuggle with the pups and watch a good movie!!

It’s hard to concentrate when all I want to do is snuggle with the pups and watch a good movie!!

J2.7

Well I’ve made it through the seventh week of J2! Which means I’m approximately 43% finished with this semester. Whoop!

I’m going to bullet point this update so that it doesn’t end up being too long:

  • I made an 86 on my first Women’s Health test last week. Not bad, especially considering I studied maybe one full day.
  • I was in the Women’s ER at Parkland this week for OB clinical. It was such an awesome experience. According to the nurses it’s not quite as crazy as Parkland’s main ER, but it did open my eyes up to the possibility of working in the ER and I have to say I can truly see myself enjoying it.
  • In the above-mentioned Women’s ER, I got to start my first IV!! It wasn’t a complete IV start since I hit a valve and the nurse had to re-start the IV in the wrist (the woman was severely dehydrated) – however I did get blood return and was actually able to draw blood from the vein for labs so I still consider it an IV start. It is just really difficult for me to coordinate my hand movements as I put in an IV…I never thought it would be so hard! It definitely requires hand dexterity.
  • I know I haven’t written anything about it yet, but my Adult 1 clinicals are going well. I am taking care of two patients this semester every week, and while it’s a bit more of a challenge as far as time management, I’m still not able to practice within the full scope of a nurse so I find myself with a lot of down time on my hands. I end up talking to my patients quite a bit which is awesome, but I’m really wanting to get some more skills experiences! Next week though I shadow in the OR so I’m pretty excited about that.
  • I am running for the presidential position of my nursing student association at TWU, and because I am running uncontested, I have unofficially gotten the position! It will be official on the 21st; I’m super thrilled about it. 😀
  • The Mayo Clinic Summer III summer externship applications open on the 15th and I will definitely be applying! I’m afraid to get my hopes up for the job but at the same time I’m REALLY REALLY hoping that I’m one of the 100 chosen. I will have to write a couple of really great essays!!
  • I will also be applying for the UTSW summer externship and the VA Residency externship for next summer as well. If you couldn’t tell, I really want a summer nursing externship! I know they are great opportunities to get much more experience and I want to do everything possible to have an edge up before I graduate as a new nurse.
  • I have my second Adult 1 test on Wednesday…so I guess it’s time to start studying. Especially since I work on Monday so there’s one less day that I have. We’re covering Diabetes, Respiratory, and Neuro though so I’m not feeling tooooo worried. Hopefully that doesn’t come back to bite me!

First OB Clinical: L&D!!

So last Tuesday I had my first OB clinical and fortunately my clinical group got to rotate through L&D first (we take turns in L&D, antepartum, postpartum, and high-risk triage/NICU/child-life services, and newborn nursery).

It was beyond amazing. I know I will probably not ever be interested in being a mother-baby nurse in any form, but I am SO incredibly grateful I got the experience that I had on Tuesday and I’m looking forward to what the next 5 clinicals hold!

So we arrived at Parkland at 0545, changed into Parkland scrubs on the L&D floor, and were ready to go by 0630. My clinical instructor asked us who REALLY wanted to see a delivery that morning and myself and 2 other gals raised our hands quickly. Of course I wanted to see a delivery!

My clinical instructor then took me into the patient’s room. I introduced myself, and since the patient was currently resting I logged into the computer and started filling in some of the pertinent info on my clinical paperwork for the day (vital signs, rupture of membranes, uterine contraction information, fetal heart rate information, etc.). Thankfully the information wasn’t difficult to find since I use the same charting system at work.

About an hour later, just as I was finished up with what I could of my paperwork (good timing!), the certified nurse midwife (CNM) comes in and explains to the mother that because she was at 10cm and fully effaced, it was time to start pushing. Eek! The atmosphere of the room completely changed as a few more people came in to help (a medical student, an L&D nurse, and a resident). The resident wasn’t there long…just basically wanted to check on the status of the mom. The CNM really did everything during that delivery – just another awesome role that nurses can play. The medical student and myself held the mom’s legs while she pushed, and the L&D nurse helped her count during contractions and monitored the fetal heart rate and the timing/intensity of the contractions.

The delivery didn’t take long…and soon the baby was born!! I didn’t think the delivery would really effect me since I’ve seen deliveries via video tape before, but it was really a miracle. I mean…to have no baby in front of you, and then, with some hard work on the part of the mom, a baby is brought into the world…WOW. I just can’t explain the feeling. I definitely cried. AND, I GOT TO CUT THE CORD!!

After the delivery I watched the pediatric nurse practitioner and the newborn nurse do the initial assessments of the baby, I watched the CNM massage the mother’s uterus and fundus to help deliver the placenta & help the uterus firm up, I played with the placenta, watched the CNM and medical student stitch the mother’s episiotomy up, and watched the mother and father’s interaction with their newborn. It was an AWESOME morning.

After we had all helped clean the mother and baby up and get the new little family settled, I left the room to finish my paperwork on the delivery. At that point, my clinical instructor found me and asked if I wanted to watch a cesarean section…YES!!!

She led me to a different L&D floor and to my new patient’s room. Again, much the same way as that morning, I walked in, introduced myself, and started my clinical paperwork on that patient. There was a lot more down time between when I met the patient and when her C-section was scheduled; because the patient wasn’t English speaking and seemed to only want to rest, as soon as I did what I could with my paperwork I left her alone and went to lunch with a few of my classmates.

About an hour or so after my lunch break, and after peppering my patient’s nurse with tons of questions (she was awesome!), we went back into the OR to deliver the baby via C-section.

Before I go on, I do have to say that I loved that the L&D nurse that was taking care of this patient was able to go into the OR with her and automatically become the circulating nurse in the OR. And, since I’ve never been in an OR it was fantastic to be able to witness exactly what a circulating nurse and a scrub nurse’s roles are. I don’t think I could ever become a scrub nurse…but I did have to sit there and consider how awesome it would be to have a job as a circulating nurse in an OR! (More options for me to consider.)

After all the prep was done on the patient and in the operating room itself, the circulating nurse called the surgeons in and everything began. The c-section began with a calm, smooth cut…but soon I was amazed at just how rough this particular surgery is. It is NOT like how it is seen in the TV shows where the surgeons make one deep cut and then pull the baby out…instead it is more like hundreds of cuts through adipose tissue, connective tissue, muscle, fascia, and finally through the uterus, all the while the surgeons are pulling, squeezing, and practically manhandling the tissues in the abdomen in order to manipulate the tissue to move the way they want it to so they can get to where they want to go. And then, after all that cutting and cauterizing, one of the surgeons reached their hands elbow deep in lengthwise through the abdomen to reach the baby and slide it out. WOAH!

And again, after the baby was born I watched the pediatric nurse practitioner and newborn nurse do the assessments and give penicillin G, clean the baby up, and then hold the baby in front of mom’s face so she could connect for a few minutes while the surgeons began the process of putting her back together.

All in all I was in the operating room for about 2 hours before my instructor came and found me (around 1530) so we could all go to post-conference and get out of clinical a bit early. But I had SUCH a great time and was thoroughly enjoying watching the surgeons sew the mother back up and observing the OR routine and rhythm that I was disappointed when it was time to go. But hopefully next L&D clinical I will get another chance to observe a c-section – and let me tell you I will thoroughly enjoy it!

One thing that I truly realized while in clinical on Tuesday…L&D nursing is completely different from med-surg nursing. For one thing you aren’t taking care of sick patients, per se (for the most part, anyway), and so it just has a very different tone and atmosphere to it. That, in my opinion, was pretty cool. Secondly, L&D nurses have to be able to be flexible and  thrive on spontaneity…there really is no set schedule on when a baby will decide it wants to be born! So assessments must be made and meds must be given on a time schedule completely dependent on what’s going on with mom and baby at the time.

I am so thrilled about what I was able to witness and experience in clinical on Tuesday and cannot wait until my next L&D clinical!!!